Luther Strange Lays Out Alabama's Clear Choice

 
Luther Strange Lays Out Alabama's Clear Choice

“Voters have a clear choice in this election: President Trump’s conservative fighter, Luther Strange, who has a record of taking on the swamp, or another hypocritical politician, Roy Moore, who has spent 40 years putting himself and his ambition ahead of Alabamians.”
Birmingham, Ala. - Voters have a clear choice in the September 26 Republican primary runoff election.  Luther Strange has a record of draining the Montgomery swamp and putting corrupt politicians behind bars.  Roy Moore, on the other hand, has spent the last forty years running for political office and putting his own ambitions ahead of Alabamians’ well-being.
 
FACT: As Attorney General, Big Luther created the Special Prosecution Division and successfully convicted corrupt officials – included the Republican State Speaker of the House – who were removed from office and/or jailed.[i]
 
FACT: Because of his success draining the Montgomery swamp, corrupt politicians tried to shut Big Luther down, gutting the Attorney General’s Office (AGO) budget and passing a law that would have given legislators the ability to block specific AGO operations and investigations.[ii]
 
FACT: Big Luther opposes career politicians and supports term limits.
 
FACT: Roy Moore has been running for office since he first ran for an Etowah County circuit judge seat in 1982 as a Democrat.
 
FACT: Roy Moore fought for pay increases for politicians while courts had to shut down because of lack of funding.[iii]  
 
FACT: Roy Moore has made a career out of profiting off of public service and sticking tax payers with the bill. [iv]  
 
Luther Strange is the only candidate in this race that has a record of delivering conservative reform and protecting rule of law.  That is why President Donald Trump has endorsed him.  He has said Big Luther is “tough on crime and borders,” and he knows will be a vital ally for him in his goal to drain the swamp and make America and Alabama great.  Roy Moore has a record of putting his own ambitions ahead of what was best for Alabama.  Our great state cannot afford another career politician. 
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 Paid for by Strange for Senate
 
[i] “AG Creates Unit To Fight Public Corruption,” Dana Beyerle, Tuscaloosa News, 4/13/12,http://www.tuscaloosanews.com/article/DA/20120413/News/605151333/TL/.
[ii] “Mike Hubbard’s Apologist In Chief Now Wears His Crown,” John Archibald, AL.com, 8/2/16,http://www.al.com/opinion/index.ssf/2016/08/mike_hubbards_apologist-in-chi.html.
[iii] While budget difficulties confronted the courts, Moore fought for pay raises for two of his top political staffers and eventually issues a five-month moratorium on jury trials.  He claimed funds were insufficient.
 “’We simply do not have the money,’ Moore told reporters. ‘We can't do anything when we don't have the money.’ Moore last week ordered the statewide jury trial moratorium from April 29 to Sept. 30, saying the judicial system can't run on the $122 million the Legislature appropriated this year. Authorities have said summer jury trials and hiring will be suspended and that 170 part-time workers will be laid off.” Source: “Moore Defends Cutbacks In State Courts As Necessary 'We Simply Do Not Have The Money,' Says Chief Justice,” Kristi Lamont Ellis and Chanda Temple, Birmingham News, 4/26/02.
 
 “Chief Justice Roy Moore gave pay raises to two of his top administrators this year as the state court system headed toward financial problems resulting in 170 layoffs. Moore gave state court administrator Rich Hobson a 5 percent merit raise from $99,538 to $104,587 annually. Scott Barnett, a lawyer who acts as spokesman for the court system, got a 2.5 percent merit raise in January that boosted his pay from $72,103 annually to $73,881, according to records kept by the Retirement System of Alabama.” Source: “Administrators Got Raises As Courts' Budget Trouble Brewed,” The Associated Press, 4/26/02.
 
[iv] Alabama’s annual mean wage in May 2016 was $42,510. Moore made nearly three times that and four times the mean wage from 2014-2016. Source: “May 2016 State Occupational Employment And Wage Estimates – Alabama,” Bureau of Labor Statistics, 5/16, https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes_al.htm#00-0000.
Moore’s annual salary during his first round as Chief Justice (2001-2003) was $153,968. 
“If Moore were to change his mind, he would have to give up one of highest paying appeals court judgeships in the country -- $153,968 annually -- for a governor's salary of $94,654, which ranks 36th among the states.” Source: “Speculation About Moore’s Run For Governor Of Alabama,” Daily Mountain Eagle, 4/9/01.
 
In response to proposed budget cuts in April 2015, Moore said the Courts needed more money. “Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore says the state's judicial branch can't properly function if cuts proposed for state agencies go into effect. Moore told lawmakers at a budget hearing in the Alabama House on Wednesday that cuts to courts' funding could result in closings and layoffs. Moore says no other Alabama state agencies have lost as much as the courts have. Administrative Director of the Courts Rich Hobson says cuts could force courts to close at least two days each week. Moore declined to say whether he supports Gov. Robert Bentley's plan for $541 million in new tax revenue.” Source: “Alabama Chief Justice Asks Lawmakers For Additional Funding,” The Associated Press, 4/15/15.
 
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